The whole family can learn about opera and have some fun at  The Family Barber on Saturday, March 22. This brand-new presentation is a backstage pass to a wild and wacky rehearsal of Rossini's beloved comedy The Barber of Seville.

The whole family can learn about opera and have some fun at The Family Barber  on Saturday, March 22. This brand-new presentation is a backstage pass to a wild and wacky rehearsal of Rossini's beloved comedy The Barber of Seville.

Featuring the beautiful sets and costumes from Lyric's recent production of The Barber of Seville,  audience members of all ages can enjoy all of the action in English-with projected English titles above the stage! The Family Barber was specially written for children ages 5 to 10. However, slightly younger or older children will still enjoy it! And there will definitely be laughs for parents and grandparents, too.

What's the story?
José Antonio Garcia plays an opera director who is completely out of his league trying to put on The Barber of Seville. His sidekick, Tutti (Alex Goodrich) is desperate to sing and unwittingly helps the director navigate his way through all that goes into staging an opera. The singing cast includes J'nai Bridges as the beautiful heroine Rosina, John Irvin  as the dashing young Count Almaviva, Will Liverman  as the ultimate fixer Figaro, and Philip Kraus as the buffoonish Dr. Bartolo. Bridges, Irvin, and Liverman are all current members of Lyric's own Ryan Opera Center. The Family Barber also features the brilliant Lyric Opera Orchestra and Chorus.

Don't forget the snacks!! You can buy food in the lobby and bring it right into the theater to enjoy during the show.  

Is this your first time at the opera? Here are some things that you might hear or see!

Listen for:

  • Arias—music sung by one person
  • Duets—music sung by two people either at the same time or taking turns
  • Choruses—a group of voices singing together
  • Different kinds of voices—from very high (soprano) to very low (bass)
  • Different types of instruments in the orchestra—string, brass, woodwind, and percussion

Look for:

  • Actors and singers wearing costumes and disguises
  • Projected English titles—words that appear on a screen above the stage that tell you what the characters are singing
  • The conductor—the person who leads the orchestra

Sometimes at the opera, people wonder when they're supposed to clap. It's time to clap:

  • When the conductor comes out to start the overture
  • After an aria or duet sung by the characters in the opera
  • At the very end of the opera
  • When the singers come out to take their bows
  • When people around you are clapping

Want to learn more about The Family Barber? Read this interview with Cayenne Harris, director of Lyric Unlimited, who gives more behind-the-scenes scoop on the production.

And Lyric's Anthony Freud, Renée Fleming, and Sir Andrew Davis give a quick preview of the show: 

 

Photo credit: Dan Rest / Lyric Opera of Chicago